Fraud and phishing explained

     
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Fraud is when someone tries to deceive you for their own financial gain. Phishing is when someone tries to get you to reveal your personal security details, like ID, passwords or bank details, in an email or text message.

Phishing scams

Phishing scams

Phishing scams are emails, texts or other messages made to look and sound like they've come from a trusted company
and are designed to get hold of your personal information.

They may ask you to:
  •  

    visit a fake or 'spoof' website and enter personal information

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    call a fake customer service number

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    click an attachment that installs malicious software on your phone, computer or tablet

Tips for staying safe

Tips for staying safe

  •  

    trust your instincts. If something looks suspicious or you're unsure about it, there's probably a catch

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    be wary of websites that only have ‘http’ in the address, if doesn’t have ‘https’ at the beginning, it’s not a secure payment site

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    don't click links in emails. Type in the address or use a search engine to find the site you're looking for

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    never enter your PIN online unless you’re very sure of the website. Be wary of pop-ups asking you to confirm your card details or enter your PIN

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    update your security software regularly and keep your firewalls up to date

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    keep the web address of your bank, credit card, mobile provider etc in your favourites. That way you can be sure you're going to the right page each time to log in, rather than clicking on links

If you suspect an email or text is fake and isn't from EE:
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    DO NOT click on any of the links within the message

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    DO NOT reply with any information

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    DO NOT download any attachments

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    DO send it to us to investigate – phishing@ee.co.uk for email, 7726 for texts

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    DO delete the message

Password re-use scam

Password re-use scam

It's important to use different passwords for each website and app that you access. This will help reduce your risk of being targeted in a 'password re-use' scam. 

Fraudsters collect usernames and passwords that have been leaked from other websites, hoping that the same username and password will be used across all of a person’s online accounts and apps. If they can get into one, they can get into others. 

About spam

About spam

Spam is unsolicited, commercial junk mail essentially marketing emails which you haven’t agreed to receive.

Marketing material sent by companies you’ve given your email address and consent to, is not spam.

Spam email tips
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    only give your email address to people you know and trust

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    try setting up a separate email account for shopping online or registering with websites or forums, keeping your 'main' email address confidential

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    if a website asks you for your email address, they want to use it for something – make sure you know what

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    read the terms of use and privacy policy of any site before telling them your address

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    look for a checkbox that lets you opt-in or opt-out of marketing messages when registering on a website. Your email address could end up in the hands of marketing departments all over the globe

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    never respond to a spam email – this can verify your address to spammers. If you recognise it as spam, delete it immediately

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    never click the 'Unsubscribe' or 'Remove from mailing list' link in spam emails – this can verify your address to spammers or be used to collect details from your computer, install malicious programs or redirect you to explicit web pages

Spam text tips
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    read any terms and conditions thoroughly before giving out your mobile phone number

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    be careful when ticking boxes when you’re offered additional marketing messages – you should be able to opt out 

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    never register with websites that promise to remove your details from spam lists – they’re not all legitimate and some use your details to send even more spam messages

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    ignore messages if you’re unsure who they’ve come from 

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    if you know the identity of the sender you can text STOP to the phone number or five-digit short code shown in the text message to opt out of future messages

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    you should tell the sender if you experience a problem with opting out and allow them time to put things right

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    don’t call the number in the text message as you may be charged at premium rate. If the message states to call or text a premium rate number or short code, you should report it to Phone-paid Services Authority (PSA) (formerly ICSTIS)

How to report spam messages

How to report spam messages

Forward the message (including phone number) to 7726. You can also forward voice spam calls, by sending
voice spam and the number which called to 7726.

If you want to stop all unsolicited sales or marketing calls, call the TPS (Telephone Preference Service) on 0207
291 3320 or send a text message to 78070 (a small charge may apply).

Or you can also report instances of spam to the Information Commissioner’s Office or by calling 0303 123 1113

> Find out more about nuisance calls and texts from Ofcom

 
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Last updated: 16/1/2018
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Malware and viruses explained